When Should I Retire?

Few decisions in your life are as complex and fraught with significant consequences as the decision on when to retire. For most of us, this decision will affect more than just ourselves. Your decision cannot be made in a vacuum if you have a significant other, spouse, or others that depend on your paycheck. Many will consider issues such as the size of their retirement and investment portfolios, age, physical health, and the state of the economy. Still, others look to stagnation and boredom with their careers, the availability of a pension or social security, or even an inheritance.

Many books have been written about retirement and there is a wide spectrum of opinion on when people should retire, especially given that people are generally living longer. It was not so long ago that people rarely lived into their 70’s. Today, it is common for people to live to their 90’s or beyond. The fact that our lifespans are increasing with advances in medicine and technology begs the question: should we retire at all?

A very large segment of the country retires at age 62, which coincidentally is the earliest age you can qualify for social security retirement benefits. However, for the eager beavers who decide to do so, they should know that those benefits could potentially be permanently reduced by about 25 percent. For someone who might be around until age 92, that’s a lot of income to forgo. It is possible you may spend three decades in retirement. What the heck are you going to do with yourself for all those years? Visit the grand-kids, play golf, or work in the garden?

Before you even consider the idea of when to retire, engage the services of a financial and retirement income advisor team. Ideally, you will want to work with individuals who have decades of experience working with people similar to you. You will want to look for someone who is not close to retiring themselves.  Imagine how hard it could be to find someone you can trust 10 years from now when your advisor retires.  That is the last thing you will want to do while enjoying your Golden Years.

With all this said, remember that the decision as to when to retire does not just affect you. Your loved ones deserve to be part of the conversation and the decision-making process. Make sure your planning takes into account the financial aspect of retirement and also the life and living parts. You may have bid your spouse goodbye five days a week at 8:00 am for decades. But when that stops, things will change. That change may be for the better or worse, and you need to plan for that, too.

 

1930518/DOFU 10-2017

As We Head Towards Dow Jones 20,000 And Turn The Page On 2016…

Disclaimer:  I wrote this article in early January 2017, but this information should still provide value.

As we head towards Dow 20,000 and turn the page on 2016, now is the perfect time to map out your financial resolutions for the New Year and beyond.  Here are a few suggestions for making 2017 healthy, happy and successful:

  1. Create emergency savings

Life is full of unexpected emergencies, and having extra cash on hand can help keep a serious illness, home repair, or other sudden financial need from derailing your finances.  Prepare for unpredictable expenses by putting aside the equivalent of three to six months of expenditures.

  1. Make a monthly budget and stick to it

Budgets may sound like a lot of unnecessary work, especially if you’re financially comfortable.  But if you’re not tracking your spending, you may be surprised by how quickly it adds up – and which expenses are costing you the most.  As 2017 begins, set a budget and work on sticking to it for three months.  Track your performance and revise the budget, as needed.  Don’t aim for perfection, instead, try for incremental improvement.

  1. Save more for the future

Creating a disciplined savings strategy is an important way to stay on track for your retirement and other goals.  We recommend keeping separate “buckets” of savings for short- and long-term goals.

  1. Make retirement plan contributions regularly (instead of all at once)

Even if you’re diligently saving, you may be among the 71% of Americans who haven’t put aside enough money for retirement.  One key change you can make is to take advantage of “time in the market”.  Instead of waiting until the last minute to make your annual contributions, give your money more time to potentially grow by making automatic contributions to your account every month. (Source: Washington Post)

  1. Maximize your retirement-plan contributions

Tax-managed retirement accounts are one of the most powerful ways to save for a more comfortable retirement, because they allow you to control your tax liabilities today – while potentially accumulating assets for the future.  Make the most of these accounts by contributing as much as you can.

  1. Pay down high-interest debt

Did you know that 54% of Americans believe they will never pay off their debts?  Don’t let high interest debt keep you from getting ahead financially.  If you’re carrying a significant amount of debt, make paying it down a top priority. (Source: Associated Press)

  1. Create a powerful legacy for the world

We believe that a rich life involves more than financial success and a comfortable lifestyle.  Whether you want to leave something to your loved ones or support causes you care about, take time to address the legacy you’d like to leave.

  1. Review your estate planning and legal documents

Your core legal documents need regular reviews to ensure they keep up with any changes in your life.  If a few years have passed since you looked at your documents, dust them off and make sure that they still represent your wishes.

  1. Stay on top of your health

Healthcare is a major expense for most Americans, especially if serious illness strikes.  Take steps to protect your well-being by building a healthy lifestyle and prioritizing preventative care.

  1. Involve your children and grandchildren in your finances

Fostering financial wisdom is a powerful way to help your children and grandchildren build a solid, stable life – and help ensure you’re able to pass on your values and wealth in the future.  Rather than keeping your finances private from your loved ones, we recommend including them in conversations about your goals and priorities.

Think long-term, not short-term.  Recently, we’ve spoken to many clients who want to ride the post-election growth train.  Just as we’re here to help you from despairing when stocks tumble, we also want to help control the euphoria when markets rally.  This has been a narrow rally, and rallies don’t usually continue forever.  Impulsive choices can challenge your long-term objectives.  As always, it’s important to take the right amount of risk for your unique circumstances and stay focused on the long-term goals that we are pursuing together.

Have a Safe and Happy New Year!

 

2011373 /DOFU 02/2018

How Important Is a Financial Plan?

This question has come my way many, many times over the last 15+ years.  And I am glad it has.  It’s a great question and it opens the door to fabulous conversations.

In my humble opinion, a fee-based financial plan is extremely important.  It acts as a blueprint to get you moving towards your financial goals.  Would you try and build a house without a blueprint?  You could try, and possibly succeed, but I highly doubt the end result would be as you initially dreamed up and I would imagine it would take a heck of a lot longer to finish that house and at a much higher cost.  And let’s not forget about the added stress…doesn’t seem worth it to me.  Would you ever head out on a two week road trip across the country to Florida or California without some sort of map, directions or way to guide you on your journey?  Of course not!  So why approach your financial life any different?

Whether you are dreaming about paying for your children’s college or putting together your goals, hopes and dreams for retirement, a financial plan will serve as the blueprint for working towards achieving those things.

A financial plan is not a static document that gets put together, and then sits on a shelf somewhere or in a computer file.  No, this plan should be reviewed annually.  Things change, life happens and you need your plan to change with you.

Already retired?  A plan is just as important for you as it is for those saving for retirement.  You need a plan to help ensure your income lasts as long as you do.

Separate from the financial plan and our role as financial planner, we may recommend the purchase of specific investment or insurance products or accounts.  These product recommendations are not part of the financial plan and you are under no obligation to follow them. 2011277/DOFU 1-2018

So What Goes into a Comprehensive Financial Strategy?

So What Goes into a Comprehensive Financial Strategy?

First, identify your goals.  They might look like the following, for example:

  • Pay for 50% to 100% of each child’s college costs
  • Retire at 65 or 68
  • Be able to pay cash for a new car, approximately $30,000, every 6 years
  • Have the option of getting away for a few months every winter, when retired
  • Save up a 20% down payment for next house
  • Balance our spending with our saving and charitable goals
  • Pay off all debt in 7 years
  • Ensure that in the event of my death or disability my family can maintain the same lifestyle that it is used to

The list could be endless.  If you can dream it, put it down.  You then work on prioritizing and running a financial analysis for the various goals you have rated a top priority.

For most people I work with, retirement is the largest – in terms of dollars that will need to be saved – future financial goal they have.  Retirement is most certainly a journey.  And with today’s rising life expectancies (people are living much longer than most ever thought) the journey could be a long one…hopefully a long, FUN journey.  With that being said, I think it’s extremely important to invest a handful of hours up front and a couple every 1-3 years, making sure you are making progress towards this goal.  Your strategy should address things like longevity (how long you might live), as well as the rising costs of things like food, utilities and medical care.  How much risk can you tolerate taking with your investments?  Your strategy will require some assumptions like rate of return, taxes and future income needs.  These things should be looked at and updated and changed if need be.

2011290/DOFU 1-2018